A Scholarly Treatise On The Origins of The 'Casia Illuminata'

by Adam Houghton November 01, 2019

A Scholarly Treatise On The Origins of The 'Casia Illuminata'

Detailed references to the Casia Illuminata first appear in an 11th Century Norman text. There it is described by Abrehen the Scholar as an artifact of ‘Temporal Power’ and ‘Strange Internal Luminosity’. He describes the source of it’s pulsing glow as ‘A witching stone born of the heavens’.

19th century scholars believed the stone to be a sacred object belonging to the Norse or Viking predecessors of the Normans who first discovered it’s peculiar properties. The pyramidal encasement was purportedly an addition by early Normans meant to focus the power of the stone. There is some evidence supporting the claim that the object aided William The Conqueror in his victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. 

The first reference to the hooves can be dated to 1429 when they appear depicted in a tapestry illustrating the coronation of King Charles VII. This may account for the Fleur-de-lis motif, a common symbol of the French monarchy. In recent years however a new theory has emerged regarding the origin of the cloven hooved legs. Detailed examinations of the artifact reveal a lack of tool marks and a psycho-spectral field of unusual strength. The appendages could be phantasmagoric in origin. In short, the Casia Illuminata may have ‘grown’ legs of its own volition.

 

An early depiction of the Illuminata





Adam Houghton
Adam Houghton

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